For citation purposes: El Haddad E, Lauritano D, Candotto V, Carinci F. Guided bone regeneration is a reliable technique in implant dentistry: An overview and a case report. OA Dentistry 2014 Mar 10;2(1):5.

Case report

 
Oral Surgery

Guided bone regeneration is a reliable technique in implant dentistry: An overview and a case report.

E El Haddad, D Lauritano, V Candotto, F Carinci
 

Authors affiliations

(1) Private practice, Turin, Italy

(2) Bicocca University, Milan, Italy

(3) University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy

* Corresponding author Email: crc@unife.it

Abstract

Introduction

The use of dental implants has become a widespread and predictable treatment modality for the restoration of missing teeth and various edentulous cases. It is clear that the use of a regenerative technique with dental implant placement is an important step which assists the process of bone regeneration. As the clinical success of implant therapy is based on osseointegration, defined as the direct anchorage of the implant in the bone tissue without the interposition of fibrous tissue, considerable research has been conducted to promote bone growth. The basic principle of Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) involves the placement of mechanical barriers to protect blood clots and to isolate the bone defect from the surrounding connective tissue, thus providing bone-forming cells with access to a secluded space intended for bone regeneration. The use of GBR to treat bony defects around dental implants has been extensively documented throughout the past decades and among all the available non resorbable barrier membranes used for GBR procedures, membranes made of e-PTFE have become the membrane of choice in many clinical situations. Data reported in the literature seem to demonstrate that GBR procedures are a reliable means for augmenting bone in cases of vertical and/or horizontal defects in partially edentulous patients. These data suggest that GBR should be considered a reliable technique for obtaining bone formation and placing dental implants in cases in which it would otherwise not be possible. This paper reports an overview and a clinical case about the use of GBR in implant surgery.

Case report

A 54 year old male underwent surgery with the guided bone regeneration technique (GBR) at the same time of insertion of two implants elements 3.6 and 3.7 (Figure 1). After the insertion of the implants, bone chips have been put around them and covered with a e-PTFE membrane with a core of titanium (GBR). After seven months, it has been seen how the bone graft had completely and totally caught on to the plants and receiving bone. Then it was proceeded to the second step surgery with the insertion of the abutment on which to place the implants later. In this circumstance, the keratinized gingiva was split and positioned around the healing abutment.

Conclusion

Based on our result, combined with the information already available in the literature, we may state that GBR is a safe and effective technique for obtaining bone formation and placing dental implants in cases in which it would otherwise not be possible, even if an ideal membrane for treatment is not yet established.

Licensee OA Publishing London 2014. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)
Keywords