For citation purposes: Bhatnagar R, Pokhrel R, Tandon A. Redeeming dissection course for medical undergraduates by compact structured schedules and frequent in-course assessments. OA Anatomy 2013 Oct 23;1(3):26.

Research study

 
Basic Anatomy

Redeeming dissection course for medical undergraduates by compact structured schedules and frequent in-course assessments

R Bhatnagar, R Pokhrel, A Tandon
 

Authors affiliations

Department of Anatomy, Armed Forces Medical College, Pune 40, India

* Corresponding author Email: rongon28us@yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction

Trends of doing away with dissection in anatomy are increasing worldwide for a variety of reasons. We have developed a strategy to redeem dissection by making it more purposeful and edit it to highlight clinical relevance using 90 structured dissection schedules and frequent in-course assessments.

Materials and methods

This strategy was tested by a longitudinal interventional study in medical undergraduates in the first year of preclinical phase. Out of 268 students, 134 were in a study group and the remaining 134 in a control group. Groups were similar in terms of age and sex composition and, prior academic performance. For the control group, dissection was performed using traditional methods and for the study group by the new strategy using 90 structured dissection schedules and weekly in-course assessments. Comparison of these groups was made in terms of their performance in three examinations spanning over one academic year.

Results

The study group performed better than the control group in both written and oral/practical parts of the first term, preliminary examinations and university examinations, the difference being statistically significant.

Conclusion

The threat to wreak havoc on the very edifice of medical education is to be countered by making dissection indispensable. It has been achieved by following a planned strategy that makes the student realise the importance of dissection. Dividing dissection course in well-defined schedules and conducting frequent in-course assessments improves the participation and performance of medical undergraduates.

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