OA Epidemiology

The Association between Shift Work and Lifestyle Factors among 59,947 Female Nurses in the Nightingale Study

Proceedings of the 2013 annual meeting of the Netherlands Epidemiology Society

Volume 1 Issue S1 Abstract 47

 

M. van Lunteren, Dutch Cancer Institute/VU, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
A. Pijpe, Dutch Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
R.C.H. Vermeulen, IRAS, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
P. Slottje, IRAS, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
H. Kromhout, IRAS, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands
F.E. van Leeuwen, Dutch Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
M.A. Rookus, Dutch Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Background
The 24-hour economy is fast-growing and leads to a high prevalence of night shift work (i.e. 19%). Shift work has been related to numerous health problems, among which are cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disorders, digestive troubles, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and sleep problems. Thus, a huge number of people worldwide may be at an increased risk of several (chronic) diseases. Over the last decades, the potential association between shift work and breast cancer risk has been hotly debated. Lifestyle is one of the suggested mediators in this association. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between night work and lifestyle factors in the Nightingale study.

Methods
The Nightingale study is a prospective cohort study among 59,947 female nurses and was established in the Fall of 2011 in the Netherlands. Women completed a baseline questionnaire on demographics, job history, occupational exposures including a detailed section on (night) shift work, lifetime information on lifestyle, reproductive factors, and medical history. Multinomial logistic multilevel analyses were conducted to investigate the association between night work and body weight, physical activity, and alcohol consumption (univariate and multivariate). We also assessed whether the association differed by age or calendar period.

Results
The results will be presented at the WEON 2013.

Conclusions
The results of this study could provide clues for efficient worksite prevention but may also provide clues on the biological mechanisms in the association between shift work and breast cancer risk, which will be investigated in the Nightingale study in the future.

Published: 06 Jun, 2013

 
Licensee OA Publishing London 2013. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)