OA Epidemiology

WEIGHT CHANGE LATER IN LIFE AND COLON AND RECTAL CANCER RISK IN THE EUROPEAN PROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION INTO CANCER AND NUTRITION STUDY

Proceedings of the 2013 annual meeting of the Netherlands Epidemiology Society

Volume 1 Issue S1 Abstract 50

 

C.N. Steins Bisschop ( a), C.H. van Gils (a), M.J. Emaus (a), H.B. Bueno-de-Mesquita (b,c), E.M. Monninkhof (a), K. Aleksandrova (d), H. Boeing (d), T Norat (e), M Jenab (f), E Riboli (e), P.H.M. Peeters (a,e), A.M. May (a)

(a) Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
(b) Center for Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands
(c) Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands
(d) Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany
(e) Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
(f) Lifestyle, environment and cancer group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France


Introduction
High BMI (Body Mass Index) and high weight gain since age 18 is associated with colorectal cancer. Less is known about the association between weight change later in life and subsequent colon and rectal cancer risk.

Methods
We investigated the relationship among 328,781 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort, aged 25-70 years. Body weight was measured at recruitment and mainly self-reported on average 5 years later. Weight change (kg/year) was categorized in sex-specific quintiles (Q), with the combined quintiles 2 and 3 as the reference category (i.e. -0.6 to 0.3 kg/year and -0.4 to 0.4 kg/year in men and women, respectively). In the subsequent years, participants were followed for the occurrence of colon and rectal cancer for a median period of 6.8 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to study the association.

Results
480 and 781 incident colon cancer and 354 and 393 rectal cancer cases were identified in men and women, respectively. No significant effects were found for the relationships between high weight gain (Q5) or weight loss (Q1) and colon or rectal cancer risk in men and women. Only moderate weight gain (Q4: 0.3 to 0.8 kg/yr) was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in men (HR 1.32; 95% CI 1.04; 1.68) but not in women. There was no interaction between weight change and baseline BMI, waist circumference or hormone replacement therapy.

Conclusion
Overall, our results do not indicate an association between short-term weight change in adulthood and colon and rectal cancer risk in men and women.

Published: 06 Jun, 2013

 
Licensee OA Publishing London 2013. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)