OA Epidemiology

Dietary Intakes and Risk of Lymphoid and Myeloid Leukemia in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

Proceedings of the 2013 annual meeting of the Netherlands Epidemiology Society

Volume 1 Issue S1 Abstract 51

 

F.S. Hosnijeh, Utrecht University, the Netherlands; Zanjan University, Iran
P. Peeters, Julius Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Imperial College, London, UK
I. Romieu, IARC-WHO, Lyon, France
R. Kelly, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK
E. Riboli, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, UK
A. Olsen, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
A. Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark
G. Fagherazzi, Gustave Roussy Institute/Paris South University, Villejuif, France
F. Clavel-Chapelon, Gustave Roussy Institute/Paris South University, Villejuif, France
L. Dossus, Gustave Roussy Institute/Paris South University, Villejuif, France

Also on behalfof: A. Nieters,B. Teucher, A. Trichopoulou, A. Naska, E. Valanou,  A. Mattiello, S. Sieri, C.L. Parr, D. Engeset, G. Skeie, M. Dorronsoro, A. Barricarte, M.J. Sánchez, U. Ericson, E. Sonestedt, H.B. Bueno-de-Mesquita, M.M. Ros, R.C. Travis, T.J. Key, P.Vineis, R.Vermeulen

Background
The etiology of leukemias cannot entirely be explained by known risk factors including ionising radiation, benzene exposure, and infection with human T cell leukemia virus. A number of studies suggested that diet influences the risk of adult leukemias. However results have been largely inconsistent. We examined the potential association between dietary factors and risk of leukemias among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

Methods
Among the 477,325 participants with mean follow-up of 11.34 years (Standard Deviation=2.47), 773 leukemias (373 and 342 cases of lymphoid and myeloid leukemia respectively) were identified. Diet over the previous  12 months  was assessed at baseline using a validated country-specific dietary questionnaire. Cox proportional  hazard regression was used to explore the association between dietary factors that have previously been associated with leukemia risk including red and processed meat, poultry, offal, fish, dairy products, vegetables, fruits, and seeds/ nuts and risk of both lymphoid and myeloid leukemias.

Results
No significant associations were observed between dietary measures and total, lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. Moreover, subtype analyses showed no dietary association with risk of major subtypes of leukemias.

Conclusion
In summary, this study did not support a possible link between selected dietary factors and risk of leukemias.

Published: 06 Jun, 2013

 
Licensee OA Publishing London 2013. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)