OA Epidemiology

Egg Sensitization, but not Milk Sensitization, in Infancy Associated with Asthma during 11 Years of Follow-Up: The PIAMA Birth Cohort

Proceedings of the 2013 annual meeting of the Netherlands Epidemiology Society

Volume 1 Issue S1 Abstract 15

 

M.B. Bekkers, Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services (VPZ), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven
B. Brunekreef, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht
U. Gehring, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht
H.A. Smit, Julius Centre for Health sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht
G.H. Koppelman, Department of Pulmonology and Pediatric Allergology, GRIAC Research Institute, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen
J.J. de Jongste, Department of Pediatrics, Erasmus University Medical Center, Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam
M. Kerkhof, Department of Epidemiology, GRIAC Research Institute, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen
R.C. Aalberse, Department of Immunopathology, Sanquin Research, Amsterdam
A.H. Wijga, Centre for Nutrition, Prevention and Health Services (VPZ), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven

Background
Children of allergic parents are at increased risk to develop asthma. Early insight into the prognosis of these high-risk children is important.  Allergic sensitization is often applied as determinant. We investigated in high-risk infants whether sensitization to any particular allergen is more important in the association with asthma development than sensitization to other allergens.

Methods
The study population consisted of 565 high-risk participants of the PIAMA birth cohort study with specific IgE measurements around their first birthday. The associations between sensitization in infancy and asthma in the next 11 years, collected by annual questionnaires, were assessed using generalized  estimating equations. Prevalence ratios for the association with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) at age 8 were obtained by log binomial regression analyses.

Results
159 children (29%) were sensitized to any of the allergens measured at age one: 142 to milk,
36 to egg and 16 to inhalant allergens (cat, dog or house dust mite). Children sensitized to egg in infancy were at increased risk of asthma later in childhood (OR 2.5 (95%CI 1.2-5.1)) and BHR at age 8 years (PR 1.5 (95%CI 1.1-2.0)). Sensitization to milk in infancy was not associated with asthma in later years (OR 1.0 (95%CI 0.6-1.6)) or BHR (PR 1.0 (95%CI 0.8-
1.3)), neither was sensitization to any allergen.

Conclusions
Currently, the most commonly used determinant of asthma in statistical models is early sensitization to any allergen. Our findings highlight differential associations between various forms of sensitization and asthma development that may be relevant for prediction modeling.

Published: 06 Jun, 2013

 
Licensee OA Publishing London 2013. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)