For citation purposes: Cohen IL. Behaviour profiles of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder on the parent pervasive developmental disorder Behaviour Inventory. OA Autism 2013 May 01;1(1):10.

Research study

 
Diagnosis Advancements

Behaviour profiles of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder on the parent Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behaviour Inventory

IL Cohen
 

Authors affiliations

Department of Psychology, New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, 1050 Forest Hill Rd., Staten Island, NY 10314, USA.

*Corresponding author Email: ira.cohen@opwdd.ny.gov

Abstract

Introduction

Substantial overlap exists between autism spectrum disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at multiple levels. Aetiologically, similarity exists in genetic liability for the two disorders. Phenotypically, comorbidity exists between autism spectrum disorder and symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with rates varying between 28% and 92% and both groups have similar problems with social cognition. The aim of this study was to discuss behaviour profiles of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder on the parent PDD Behaviour Inventory.

Materials and methods

Parent ratings of children with autism spectrum disorder (with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder behaviours) were compared with parent ratings of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder behaviours who did not have autism spectrum disorder (the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder group) using the PDD Behaviour Inventory, a rating instrument that is age-standardised on children with autism spectrum disorder and which assesses both maladaptive behaviours and adaptive skills.

Results

The attention deficit hyperactivity disorder group’s maladaptive behaviours were rated as more severe than the autism spectrum disorder group, especially on those domains assessing fears and aggression. Further, the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder group was rated as having greater severity of fears and aggression when compared with those in the autism spectrum disorder group who also had comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder behaviours. By contrast, the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder group was rated as having better expressive language ability than the autism spectrum disorder group (especially when compared with those in the autism spectrum disorder group with comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder behaviours). It is hypothesised that the increased severity of fears and aggression in the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder group may reflect their relatively increased ability to communicate these problems to others.

Conclusion

These data extend findings from previous studies and suggest that a unique attention deficit hyperactivity disorder profile may exist for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder on the PDD Behaviour Inventory.

Licensee OA Publishing London 2013. Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY)
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